Should an Uprooted Tree Be Replanted or Removed?

Uprooted trees do not survive for long, especially in the summer heat. Regardless of why your tree has uprooted, it is important to make a decision, fast. Continue below to learn which considerations to think about when deciding between replanting or removing an uprooted tree, plus where to get affordable tree service near you.

Tree Removal Service Indianapolis IN 317-783-2518
Tree Removal Service Indianapolis IN 317-783-2518

Why Do Trees Come Out of the Ground?

There are many causes behind an uprooted tree, the most common being storms and similar types of inclement weather. However, other reasons why trees uproot from the ground include, but are not limited to, construction accidents, landscaping errors, flooding, drainage issues, soil disruption, soil instability, root damages, poor tree structure, gradation changes, and even wind-throw magnitude.

Will an Uprooted Tree Survive?

Whether an uprooted tree can survive a replant or not depends on several factors, mostly the size and condition of the tree, but also the underlying circumstances that caused the uprooting to begin with. Your best course of action would be to contact a local tree service company in Indianapolis to inspect your uprooted tree and analyze its potential for survival.

Smaller, younger trees have a higher chance of survival after an uprooting. Their root systems are fresh, and not as complex as that of a larger, more mature tree. Larger trees pose more challenges because of their size and the complexity of their root system. For this reason, they are hard to reestablish into the ground after they have been uprooted. In most cases, large trees do not survive transplanting.

Reintegrating a Small, Uprooted Tree

As soon as a small tree uproots from the ground, cover the exposed root ball with a tarp to lock in as much moisture as possible. To reintegrate the uprooted tree into the ground, you will need to dig a new hole directly under the root ball. Use the dirt from that hole to refill the hole the tree came out of originally.

Cut off any broken protruding roots, then gently lift the tree upright and position it inside the new hole you just dug. Pack the soil around the base of the tree, then give it ample water. Do not add fertilizer until you have seen new growth on the tree. You may also want to prune any broken tree branches, but this is not a recommended tree practice for summertime.

Transplant Shock

When a tree is removed from its initial growth spot and reburied in a new spot, a lot of things can go wrong. The altered soil composition, potentially delicate root system, moisture levels, light conditions, and many other factors can negatively affect this relocation process.  It can cause a tree to go into an adjustment state called transplant shock. When this occurs, the leaves of the tree change to a yellowish-brown color, curl up at the ends, wilt, and fall off. This type of tree decline is called leaf scorch, and it is caused from dehydration and nutrition deficiency, which stems from tree relocation.

Are you looking for professional advice or service for your uprooted or fallen tree? Contact Complete Tree Care at 317-783-2518 for tree removal services in Indianapolis, Indiana, and all surrounding locations. We serve residential and commercial clients.

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Should I Remove a Dead Sycamore Tree?

Sycamores are magnificent ancient species that deserve so much gratitude. If you have a sycamore tree on your property, you are one lucky homeowner. So, when your sycamore tree starts to show signs of decline or has not sprouted leaves this spring, you may be asking yourself some very important questions. Is my sycamore tree dead? Why did my sycamore tree die? Should I remove a dead sycamore tree? Continued below to learn the answers to these questions and more.

Sycamore Tree Removal Indianapolis IN 317-783-2518
Sycamore Tree Removal Indianapolis IN 317-783-2518

The American Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis)

The American sycamore tree is a prevalent species in U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) hardiness zones 4 through 9, which means they are very common here in the Hoosier state. They are one of the tallest growing trees in our region, achieving heights as high as 100 feet! American Sycamores also bear round, button-like fruit that looks similar to a Christmas tree ornament. Each ball is a cluster of seeds, appearing rough on the surface. They bloom in late summer when temperatures are high and steady. They are unique in that the fruit remains attached to the tree through the winter season, rather than dropping in the fall like similar deciduous trees. When spring arrives, the cluster of seeds will break apart and fall to the ground.

How Does Your Sycamore Tree Look Right Now?

Being that is it in fact spring, your sycamore trees should be dropping their fruit right about now. But if your trees haven’t even sprouted leaves at this point, it could be dead. In fact, a sycamore tree that is still bare and leafless in spring is a top sign that it is dead. Additional signs of a dead or dying Sycamore tree include missing bark, damaged bark, dropping branches, past outbreaks, epicormic sprouting at the base of the trunk, or only one side of the tree sprouting leaves.

However, it is possible that only part of the tree is dead when exhibiting such signs. This is where diagnosis gets a little tricky. It is important to consult a licensed and insured Indianapolis tree service company for an accurate diagnosis. They can determine whether your tree is dead and if it should be removed for safety reasons.

When to Remove a Dead or Dying Sycamore Tree

In most cases, a dead sycamore tree will not need to be removed. Those that do will exhibit certain signs. Specifically, a sycamore tree should be removed if it is leaning, dropping branches, or has more than 50% damage to the trunk or canopy. Always enlist the services of a professional Indianapolis tree care contractor for safe tree removal services.

Never attempt to remove a dead sycamore tree on your own. There are several hazards and safety concerns involved in tree work that are beyond the untrained eye. Proper tree removal requires expert knowledge and training, as well as state licensing, industry-specific resources and materials, quality equipment, and more.

Do you have a dead tree that needs to be removed on your lot? Contact Complete Tree Care at 317-783-2518 for licensed and insured tree removal in Indianapolis, Indiana and its surrounding counties. We serve residential and commercial clients.

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Why You Should Not Plant Prunus Trees if You Live Near a Farm

The Prunus species includes over 400 deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs that yield stone fruit.  The most common stone fruit trees include cherry, plum, almond, apricot, peach, and nectarine. Although these fruit and ornament-bearing trees are lovely all year-round and provide a long list of benefits for both society and nature, they do threaten the health and vitality of livestock, including horses. If you are looking to buy new farmland for your livestock and equines, it is wise to look out for Prunus trees. All 400+ species are poisonous to livestock, donkeys, and horses.

Continue reading to learn more about Prunus toxicity, and which parts of stone fruit trees are toxic to livestock.

Tree Removal Service Indianapolis Indiana 317-783-2518
Tree Removal Service Indianapolis Indiana 317-783-2518

Toxicity Levels of a Prunus Tree

All parts of Prunus trees are poisonous to livestock, expect the ripened fruit. The fruit is entirely edible when mature, and will not have an adverse effect on livestock, cattle, and equines. This refers to the actual cherries, plums, nectarines, peaches, almonds, and apricots. However, all other parts of the tree are toxic if ingested. A host of cyanogenic glycosides are the compounds in Prunus trees that make them toxic to livestock and many other animals.

Cyanogenic glycosides are cyanide molecules attached to sugar molecules, and they are located inside plant cell vacuoles. When the plant cell vacuoles of a Prunus tree are ruptured, the glycosides are released and allowed to come into contact with other parts of the plant tissue. When this happens, the compounds break down into their constituent molecules, both sugar and hydrogen cyanide, which is a poison.

So, when livestock chews on any Prunus plant material, whether twigs or leaves, they ingest these compounds. And once ingested, the poison prevents the animal’s red blood cells from releasing oxygen, which leads to suffocation. As little as two pounds of Prunus leaves can be fatal to full-grown cattle in a matter of minutes.

Prunus Tree Removal is Recommended

It is strongly recommended to remove Prunus trees if you live near a farm or livestock animal shelter of any kind. If you have Prunus trees on your land, it is understandable if you cannot remove all of them. With large numbers, that could be unreasonable. So, for those you cannot remove and are accessible to your livestock, be sure to have plenty of other forages for them to choose from.

Livestock is very unlikely to eat Prunus species of tree unless they do not have an ample selection of fodder. Fencing-in animals or fencing-in Prunus trees are other effective methods of prevention. Be sure to also check your fields after a heavy storm to make sure branches and leaves of Prunus trees are accessible to your animals.

Do you have Prunus trees on your property that need to be removed? Contact Complete Tree Care at 317-783-2518 for lot clearing and tree removal in Indianapolis, Indiana you can trust. We serve commercial and residential clients.

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