FAQS About Angiosperms and Gymnosperms

There are various tree species here in Indiana, ranging in color, size, shape, growth patterns, and more. But all trees can be categorized into one of two categories: deciduous or conifer. Deciduous trees shed their foliage in the fall and re-bloom them in the spring. Conifer trees, also known as evergreens, keep their foliage all year long.

When trying to determine if a tree is an angiosperm or gymnosperm, your first step is to determine if it is a deciduous or conifer. Continue reading to learn the difference between an angiosperm and gymnosperm in order to improve your tree identification skills!

Indianapolis Indiana Tree Service 317-783-2518
Indianapolis Indiana Tree Service 317-783-2518

Frequently Asked Questions About Angiosperms and Gymnosperms

What are Angiosperms?

Angiosperms are a taxonomic class of flowering trees. These trees produce seeds that, when matured, is enclosed in an ovule (usually a fruit). For example, an apple is the mature seed that an angiosperm tree produces. The apple is the ovary, or ovule. Angiosperm trees lose their leaves in the fall, and regrow them in the spring, making them a deciduous tree. They are classified as hardwoods, and include species like oaks, maples, dogwoods, and more.

Common Angiosperms:

▷ Lilies
▷ Orchids
▷ Roses
▷ Sunflowers
▷ Oak Trees
▷ Maple Trees
▷ Fruit-Bearing Trees

What are Gymnosperms?

Gymnosperms are a taxonomic class of non-flowering trees that produce a mature seed that is not enclosed inside an ovule of any kind. A pine cone is a perfect example. Also known as “naked seed”, gymnosperm trees are softwoods, and do not lose their foliage in the winter. This makes these conifers. Species include pine trees, cedars, spruces, and firs.

Common Gymnosperms:

▷ Pine Trees
▷ Conifers
▷ Cycads
▷ Spruce Trees
▷ Firs

How Can You Tell the Difference Between the Two?

Here is the general rule to remember: Conifers are gymnosperms and deciduous trees are angiosperms. There are exceptions to the rule, however. You see, some angiosperms keep their leaves in the winter, such as live oak, sweet bay magnolia, and rhododendron trees. And gymnosperm trees do lose their foliage in the winter, such as ginkgo, dawn redwood, and bald cypress trees.

Looking for prompt and professional tree care in your area? Contact Complete Tree Care at 317-783-2518 for Indianapolis Indiana tree services you can trust. We serve residential and commercial clients.

You Might Also Enjoy:

Common Glossary Terms for Tree Leaves
What are Monocots and Dicots?
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Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518
Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518

Should I Brace My Trees For Winter?

Tree cabling and bracing is an important preventative maintenance practice used in the landscaping and tree care industry. Many property owners are confused on whether or not they need to brace their trees for the harsh winter weather ahead. Although cabling and bracing offers a wide range of important benefits, it is not necessary for all trees.

Continue reading to learn more about tree cabling and bracing, including when you should implement the service for your landscaping trees.

Indianapolis Tree Service 317-783-2518
Indianapolis Tree Cabling and Bracing 317-783-2518

Tree Cabling and Bracing

The practice of tree cabling and bracing is done for the purpose of reinforcing or redirecting trees. Not only does it prevent unsteady or dead trees from falling over, it can help promote tree growth in certain directions, like out of the way of power lines. During the process, cabling and bracing hardware are installed directly on and around the tree, and then anchored to the ground. This practice still allows the tree to move naturally with the wind, but only to a limit that cannot cause any structural failures. Tree trunks, whole trees, or sections of large limbs can be cabled and braced for preventative maintenance.

Making a Decision to Cable and Brace Trees

Whether or not a tree requires cabling and bracing depends on its condition, health, location, and surrounding environment. Most trees do not require cabling and bracing. It is generally a service reserved for trees that pose hazardous structural failures, such as toppling over or large limbs falling off. Trees that are good candidates for cabling and bracing are those in areas where people and structures exist, such as neighborhoods, communities, commercial buildings, parks, and more. Trees in these areas that exhibit signs of potential instability might benefit from cabling and bracing. In all cases, young and newly-planted trees should be cabled and braced, all year long.

Signs of a Dangerous Tree

Dead trees are usually easy to spot, and commonly cabled and braced since they exponentially lose their strength and root stability. See our blog, “Top 4 Signs That Indicate a Tree is Dead” to learn how to decipher a dead tree from a live one. Accordingly, dying or diseased trees pose the same threat. These trees are often cabled to prevent them from decaying and falling. See our blog, “Common Questions and Answers About Tree Diseases” to learn more. In other cases, trees that are in areas with very bad soil conditions or poor water drainage can be very unstable, and potentially fall over in rough winds or storms. For this reason, they are also good candidates for cabling and bracing.

Get a Tree Inspection to Be Sure This Winter

Call Complete Tree Care at 317-783-2518 for comprehensive tree inspection services in Indianapolis, Indiana and surrounding locations. We serve all of Central Indiana with a wide range of skilled tree removal and tree care services, for both residential and commercial properties. Whether you need a single tree removed, or simply require routine tree service, like trimming or pruning, we can deliver prompt and professional service at a fair price. Request a free estimate, today.

Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518
Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518

The Difference Between Angiosperms and Gymnosperms

There are millions of plant species, all of which are seed-bearing and come from some form of rudimentary ovule. However, there are only two types of seed-bearing plants that all species can be categorized as depending on their seed attributes: angiosperm or gymnosperm.

Continue reading to learn the difference between the two and how it may affect your landscaping season to season.

Indianapolis Tree Service 317-783-2518
Indianapolis Tree Service 317-783-2518

Angiosperms

Angiosperms are any type of flowering plant whose seeds (ovules) are enclosed in an ovary (usually a fruit). In more understandable language, angiosperms are common gardening plants that bloom flowers from a hidden seed that is typically enclosed inside a fruit that develops from carpels. With an estimated 250,000 to 400,000 species of angiosperms on the planet, they are often considered the dominant plant-life on Earth.

Common Examples of Angiosperms:

? Lilies
? Orchids
? Roses
? Sunflowers
? Oak Trees
? Maple Trees
? Fruit-Bearing Trees

Angiosperm Attributes:

? Softwood
? Non- Perennial
? Triploid Tissue
? Flat Leaves
? Unisexual or Bisexual
? Cotyledons Present in Monocots and Dicots

Gymnosperms

In contrast to angiosperms, gymnosperms are a vascular plant whose seeds are not enclosed inside an ovary. Gymnosperms do not produce flowers or fruit, and instead have exposed, or naked, seeds on its surface. Also in contrast to angiosperms, the number of gymnosperm species are significantly lower, with less than 1,000 on the planet. are haploid

Common Examples of Gymnosperms:

? Pine Trees
? Conifers
? Cycads
? Spruce Trees
? Firs

Gymnosperm Attributes:

? Hardwood
? Perennial
? Haploid Tissue
? Scale or Needle-Like Leaves
? Absence of Cotyledons

Indianapolis Tree Care Near You

Call Complete Tree Care at 317-783-2518 for prompt and professional Indianapolis tree service you can afford. We are experienced tree care technicians that can resolve your tree problems, regardless of your projects size or scope. We offer a wide range of tree removal and tree services, for both residential and commercial properties. We even offer free estimates and free tree care advice!

Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518
Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518

How to Water a New Tree

If you have recently planted a new tree in your landscape, it is important to provide it with the proper care and attention it needs to thrive, and ultimately, reach full maturity. When trees are young or new, they require a different care regimen compared to an established tree, especially more water. For this reason, it is important to familiarize yourself with some new tree after-care facts.

Continue reading to learn how you should be caring for your new tree.

Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518
Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518

Water is Key

The most important aspect in caring for new trees is water. Newly-planted trees do not yet have a fully-grown root system, making it harder to take in the levels of water needed to survive. Because of their premature, lacking root system, new trees require a lot more watering. It is better to water deeper, and less often, as opposed to watering often, but not deep enough. Sprinkler systems do not provide the adequate amount of water a new tree needs, so be sure to always use a garden hose and nozzle attachment.

How to Water

Before you set out to water your new tree, check the moisture level of the surrounding soil. You will need to check the soil closest to the root ball of the tree (4 to 6 inches deep), so you will need a shovel to move around mulch and dirt. If the soil around the root ball is quite moist, wait to water the tree.

Check back the next day or the day after. If the soil is cool and slightly moist, it is time to water. You do not want to wait until the soil is dry. Water deeply every few days, checking the soil moisture levels before you start. Deep water can keep soil moist for a week or longer, so always check the soil before you water.

Seasonal Watering

If it is wintertime, the natural precipitation levels are adequate enough to provide a tree with the proper amounts of water. That is because trees are dormant in the winter, and require less sunlight, nutrients, and water to survive.

Indianapolis Tree Service Contractors

Call Complete Tree Care at 317-783-2518 for experienced Indianapolis tree service you can trust. We offer a wide range of residential and commercial tree work, including tree removal, trimming, pruning, stump removal, lot clearing, and more. Call 317-783-2518 to request a free estimate, today.

Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518
Indianapolis Tree Care 317-783-2518